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ON THIS DAY
Che In The Sky With Jacket

The famous ‘Che’ poster, entitled Guerrillero Heroico, taken by Alberto Korda at a mass funeral in Havana on 5th March, 1960. It went on to become one of the most reproduced photographs of all time.

Korda snapped only two shots of Che Guevara that day – one portrait, one landscape – because he had actually been dispatched by a newspaper to capture images of Fidel Castro. The photo only came to prominence years later, following the guerilla’s death, when Italian publisher Giangiacomo Feltrinelli obtained it and brought it back to Europe.

In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly ask whether the specificity of Che’s Cuban politics got lost in the mass-production of the image; explain why the Communist regime never made a penny out of sales of the photo; and reveal the surprising reason Che’s daughter believed her Dad would have enjoyed the attention…

Further Reading:

• ‘Poster boy’ (The Guardian, 2006): https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2006/jun/03/art.art

• ‘The Story Behind Che’s Iconic Photo’ (Smithsonian Magazine, 2016): https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/iconic-photography-che-guevara-alberto-korda-cultural-travel-180960615/

• ‘History vs. Che Guevara – Alex Gendler’ (Ted-Ed, 2017): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjrvKA4w9-Y

This episode first premiered in 2022, for members of 🌴CLUB RETROSPECTORS🌴 – where you can also DITCH THE ADS and get weekly bonus bits, unlock over 70 bits of extra content and support our independent podcast. Join now via Apple Podcasts or Patreon. Thanks!

 

ON THIS DAY
Che In The Sky With Jacket

The famous ‘Che’ poster, entitled Guerrillero Heroico, taken by Alberto Korda at a mass funeral in Havana on 5th March, 1960. It went on to become one of the most reproduced photographs of all time.

Korda snapped only two shots of Che Guevara that day – one portrait, one landscape – because he had actually been dispatched by a newspaper to capture images of Fidel Castro. The photo only came to prominence years later, following the guerilla’s death, when Italian publisher Giangiacomo Feltrinelli obtained it and brought it back to Europe.

In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly ask whether the specificity of Che’s Cuban politics got lost in the mass-production of the image; explain why the Communist regime never made a penny out of sales of the photo; and reveal the surprising reason Che’s daughter believed her Dad would have enjoyed the attention…

Further Reading:

• ‘Poster boy’ (The Guardian, 2006): https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2006/jun/03/art.art

• ‘The Story Behind Che’s Iconic Photo’ (Smithsonian Magazine, 2016): https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/iconic-photography-che-guevara-alberto-korda-cultural-travel-180960615/

• ‘History vs. Che Guevara – Alex Gendler’ (Ted-Ed, 2017): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjrvKA4w9-Y

This episode first premiered in 2022, for members of 🌴CLUB RETROSPECTORS🌴 – where you can also DITCH THE ADS and get weekly bonus bits, unlock over 70 bits of extra content and support our independent podcast. Join now via Apple Podcasts or Patreon. Thanks!

 

ON PREVIOUS DAYS:




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OLLY MANN

Olly Mann made his name with another trivia-wielding podcast, Answer Me This! with Helen Zaltzman – and now presents The Modern Mann, The Week Unwrapped, and Four Thought for BBC Radio Four. He also has an A-Level in History, so Dan Snow beware.

REBECCA MESSINA

Rebecca got a passion for podcasting  working at The Week magazine and a passion for trivia appearing on University Challenge in 2011, making The Retrospectors her natural home.

ARION MCNICOLL

Arion started out in satirical news in Australia, then moved to the UK to work for ostensibly serious publications including The Times, CNN, and The Week… before realising that since around 2016 the news has all been satire really.

Do you have a day of note that we should cover? Or would you or your business like to support the podcast? Get in touch!

    5 Mar: Che In The Sky With Jacket

    The famous 'Che' poster, entitled Guerrillero Heroico, taken by Alberto Korda at a mass funeral in Havana on 5th March, 1960. It went on to become one of the most reproduced photographs of all time.Korda snapped only two shots of Che Guevara that day - one portrait, one landscape -…

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